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Back and Neck Care
Millions of Americans suffer from back pain every year. The reasons for the pain are many, including bad posture, accidents, improper lifting, obesity, and weak muscles. Practice prevention to minimize your risk for back pain — get regular exercise, lose any excess weight, and learn good posture.
Heart Disease
Heart disease is the biggest health risk Americans face today. If you don’t have heart disease now, you can help prevent it. If you’ve already been diagnosed with heart disease, you can keep it from getting worse. Here are the tools to get you started.
Men's Health
Stay healthy and vigorous into old age by eating right, getting plenty of exercise and following recommended disease prevention practices.

    Which habits can harm your vision? Learn about them by taking this quiz.

    The more active you are, the more calories you burn. Running or jogging, for instance, burns more calories than bowling.

    Cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer) usually develops slowly, over several years. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Still, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for the last 15 years because of better detection and treatment. Take this simple assessment to learn about your risks for colorectal cancer.


      Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is more commonly known as acid indigestion or heartburn. It is a burning feeling behind the breastbone. This video takes a look at the possible causes of GERD, typical symptoms, and when treatment is warranted.

      Detailed information on knee replacement surgery, including the reasons and preparation for the procedure, how the procedure is performed, after care, and an anatomical illustration of the anatomy of the knee

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